Lost Dog and Bobbie Faye’s Very (very very very) Bad Day

Lost Dog

by Bill Cameron

Bobbie Faye’s Very (very very very) Bad Day

by Toni McGee Causey

An audio file of this program is available in mp3 format; click to listen.

I’m Kim Alexander and this is Fiction Nation. Two books to talk about this week — Lost Dog by Bill Cameron and Toni McGee Causey’s Bobbie Faye’s Very (very very very) Bad Day.

Let’s start with Lost Dog. Bill Cameron has written a pitch black mystery set at Christmas on the mean streets of Portland Oregon — I didn’t know there was such a thing, but I guess urban blight isn’t confined to the east coast. So we’ve got our hero, Peter McKrall. Hero‘s a funny word for Peter, though. He is the main character, the narrator, the book is about him, but calling him a hero, at least at the beginning of this book, is a bit of a stretch. He’s out of work, he’s maybe struggling with depression, he’s definitely struggling with kleptomania, of all things, and the drinking binges probably aren’t helping. In fact it’s a binge in a dive bar that brings him in contact with the first victim. Maybe. He doesn’t really remember. The villain of this piece, and there are no maybes about him, is woman-killing psycho named Jake with mother issues, among many other things. The chain of events that bring Peter and Jake together starts with the Lost Dog of the title, but it’s not even a real dog, just a falling apart stuffed animal, much loved by Peter’s niece. Because even the most faded, patchy, beat up imitation the real thing can be loved by somebody. Took me a while to decide how I felt about this book, until I realized I’d been holding my breath for several pages. Its damaged characters and cold locale make Lost Dog extremely compelling.

We’re also talking to Toni McGee Causey about her book — Bobbie Faye’s Very (very very very) Bad Day. Bobbie Faye is an adorable, charming, funny stick of dynamite from Lake Charles Louisiana. It’s not her fault that when she’s around, the National Guard often seems to get called in. She starts her bad day with three feet of water in her trailer, a kidnapped brother, and a bank heist that she inadvertently stumbles into. So she had no choice but to carjack the hot guy with the truck as a getaway car. Anyone would have done the same. There’s a mystery regarding the one valuable thing Bobbie Faye has left — her  mother’s tiara from the Pirate Days Festival, which is a real event and sounds like a throw down, by the way. There’s a lot of running through the swamps and explosions, and  Bobbie Faye even has time to fight with her ex-boyfriend the cop, and flirt with the fed she accidentally kidnapped. Obviously Bobbie Faye’s Very (very, very, very) Bad Day  is a really different kind of book than Lost Dog. So why are both authors sitting down with me? Because of something called Killer Year. Killer Year is a writing community that matches established crime and thriller writers with new authors to act as mentors through the writing and publishing process. They not only publish books written by the many active members, they also have anthologies and a really interesting website — killer year dot com. Both Bill Cameron and Toni Mcgee Causey have been adopted by writers who are I guess you could say higher up the food chain, and they are here to talk about how writing has become a little less solitary,  and their experiences with Killer Year.


I’m Kim Alexander and this is a Fiction Nation minute. The book is Lost Dog by Bill Cameron.

I frankly didn’t know how I felt about this book, a pitch dark murder mystery set in chilly Portland Oregon — until I realized I’d been up half the night reading it. The narrator is Peter McKrall — depressed, unemployed, a kleptomaniac with a spotty past. He stumbles across victim number one and attracts the attention of the killer, who is just smart enough, along with the crazy, to set Peter up with a string of coincidences that make things look very bad indeed. Lost Dog is full of sharply written, really unpleasant people; they make the few genuinely good folks stand out even more. Bill Cameron will be my guest this weekend to talk about writing Lost Dog as part of the Killer Year crime novelist program. That’s Saturday at 6pm east and Sunday at 10 am east on Fiction Nation on Book Radio, SiriusXM Channel 80.


I’m Kim Alexander and this is a Fiction Nation minute. The book is Bobbie Faye’s Very (very very very) Bad Day by Toni McGee Causey.

Bobbie Faye’s day starts with three feet of water in her trailer, and that’s probably the best thing that happens to her. She’s a chaos magnet who’s trying hard to keep custody of her niece and her head literally above water. So things go downhill fast when her trailer drowns, her no good brother gets kidnapped, and she accidentally robs a bank. She has to carjack the hot guy with the truck, she doesn’t have a choice. Soon Bobbie Faye’s Bad Day involves outwitting the Feds, staying one step ahead of the kidnappers, and running through the swamps. It is a bad and extremely funny day. Toni McGee Causey is my guest this weekend to talk about Bobbie Faye and her association with the Killer Year crime writing group. That’s at 6pm east Saturday and 10am east on Sunday on Fiction Nation on Book Radio, SiriusXM Channel 80.


I’m Kim Alexander and this is a Fiction Nation minute.

Since the first writer picked up a pen — or a sharp stick — making a book has been pretty much a job for one.  The image of the writer in a cold garret scribbling by the light of a single candle is a classic — although now more accurately they are probably in their mother’s basement working by the light of their laptop. The internet has changed the solitary nature of writing just like it’s changed most other things. This weekend on Fiction Nation, I’ll be talking with Toni McGee Causey and Bill Cameron of the Killer Year writing group. The Killer Year pairs well established writers with those on their way up, providing mentoring, moral support, cheerleading, and a place to try out new ideas. You can watch the process at killer year dot com. The Killer Year writers, on Saturday at 6pm east and Sunday at 10am east on Fiction Nation on Book Radio, SiriusXM Channel 80.

Buy Lost Dog
from Amazon.com

Buy Bobbie Faye’s Very (very very very) Bad Day
from Amazon.com